WHAT’S REALLY HAPPENING IN IRAN

Are you counting on mainstream US media to tell you what is happening in Iran?  Do you still think this is primarily a series of protests over rising prices?

Too bad for you.

Here, excerpted from the anti-Iran regime author/activist Heshmat Alavi’s article at Al-Arabiya, is a different, maybe much more informed, view of what is happening.

Starting Thursday, anti-government rallies beginning in Mashhad, northeast Iran, are mushrooming in several major cities of Tehran, Tabriz, Isfahan and Shiraz, and dozens of towns across the country.

These rallies are in sharp contrast to the 2009 episode where former US president Barack Obama refused to support the massive demands for sweeping change.

At the time, the controversial reelection of former Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad sparked nationwide rallies with protesters demanding their votes back.

Today, however, beginning with economic demands as people are reaching the very limits of their tolerance, demonstrators are seeking economic necessities and escalating their expectations to fundamental regime change.

Large crowds are turning out in Kermanshah, in the west, in Rasht, in the north, in Isfahan, southcentral Iran, and Hamadan and elsewhere.

Social media posts are providing up-to-date reports of rallies spiraling into a general outcry against the ruling elite and policies inside the country and abroad.

Protesters are seen chanting, “Death to Khamenei,” in a clear reference to Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, and targeting the very pillars of this regime.

Slogans are showing popular resentment giving way to escalating rage, exposing the regime’s vulnerability far beyond the scope of many Western analysts’ prior arguments.

Interesting is the fact that protesters are defying all odds and standing up for their rights despite warnings and repressive measures by state security forces.

“Death to Rouhani,” “Clerics Must Go” are continuing the earlier chants of “Leave Syria, start thinking about us” and “Not Gaza, Not Lebanon, my life for Iran.”

The Iranian regime no longer enjoys the benefits of a policy based appeasement and rapprochement pioneered by the Obama White House. While the Iranian people remember the international community’s failure to support their cries for freedom back in 2009, what started with support from Senator Tom Cotton is avalanching into a flowing stream of support.

The Trump administration, understanding the negative impact of engagement with the Iranian regime, is pursuing a policy of firm action and resolve vis-à-vis Tehran, and now standing alongside the Iranian people’s demand for change.

Does this make more sense than what you have been fed by much of our mainstream media?

Asking another way:  do you really think people are out in the streets, by the thousands, risking their lives against a brutal, repressive, murderous regime, over nothing more than high prices?

President Obama cut a “deal” with Iran that freed up something like 150 billion dollars for this regime.  Based on the protests, would it be fair to say that it didn’t filter down to the people of the country?  And, if so, where did that money go?

President Trump, by contrast, has cast his lot with the protesters; the people demanding an end to Khamenei, Rouhani and the funding of terrorism around the world.

Forget what you think of either man, and who you did or did not vote for in the last three elections.  Just think about which side of this you are most comfortable with the United States supporting.

That, I would hope, puts things in perspective.

1 Comment

  • Seems the $150 Billion that Obama gave the Iranian Masters might have been of some help to keep them in power.

    Repressing the populace, formenting terrorism world wide, developing nuclear weapons – – – Thanks again, Barack Obama.

    Besides a desire to act against the interests of the United States as well as bringing the world closer to nuclear war, why on earth would Obama give the mullahs such massive support — $150 Billion ! ! ! !

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