BRETT KAVANAUGH

President Trump has nominated Federal Appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court.

Judge Kavanaugh is probably the least controversial of the candidates President Trump picked from.  But that does not change the fact that he will be anathema to most Democrats, and even a couple of Republicans (most notably, Rand Paul).

In fact, the DNC has already put out a hit piece on Kavanaugh, saying he has no business being anywhere near the Supreme Court.

If Democrats hang together as a unit, Brett Kavanaugh might not be confirmed.  But that would necessitate nay votes from 10 Democrats running for re-election in states Donald Trump won – several of whose hold on their seats is already more than a little tenuous.  So don’t count on it happening.

Ironically, though, if it should happen, it will substantially increase the likelihood several of those Democrats will lose in November. This in turn, would give Republicans a larger majority for the next two years, thus exponentially increasing the opportunity for President Trump to name candidates Judge Kavanaugh’s detractors will like even less.

Let the games begin.

2 Comments

  • If Democrats hang together as a unit, Brett Kavanaugh might not be confirmed. But that would necessitate nay votes from 10 Democrats

    I thought they only need 51 votes to confirm.

    • Free – your point is well taken. But, assuming a couple of Republicans are off the wagon and voting against, if Democrats hold together as a unit they can deny Kavanaugh the seat. But with ten of them vulnerable, I very much doubt that can happen.

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